Saturday, November 25, 2017

Listen, Watch, Follow the Wind


The desert sings her lonely song




Deserts can bring solitude and oneness with the environment but can also be some of the loneliest places on the planet. Most often all I encounter is the tracks of some small living creature and hardly ever a living soul.  


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Walking across undisturbed paths, it seems like the soil has remained untouched for eons.  Just the desert winds and a rare rainstorm is all that have left traces across this barren no man’s land.  


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Once in a lifetime sun bleached bones give away secrets to what might have called this remoteness a home.  


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A weather torn shack still stands out in the middle of nowhere. Its rusted siding tells of a legacy from long ago.  Might it have been a water source for long departed dwellers?   


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On closer observation, the puzzle of cracked dried earth leaves clues that this was perhaps a catch basin for water which in the desert can be more precious than gold. 


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Layers of clear weather clouds gather atop the mountains, ominous weather with very strong winds could be on the horizon.   


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Feeling so alone in this abandoned land, it is only the wind that brings me a feeling of comfort.  Maybe the long ago spirits come in with the wind to ride again across this desolate landscape.     

 
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Photography places me in the moment where I can share that moment in time. It becomes a life story as represented by my interaction with the scene. The happiness and beauty or the sorrow and strife; how I focus leaves a lasting impression that might touch the viewer on a spiritual level. 






No images on this blog are within Public Domain and are available for free download. 

 All rights reserved, world-wide and images protected by Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). All photography, graphics, text, design, and content is copyrighted by Bonnie Rannald and should not be copied, down-loaded, transferred and re-created in any way without the express consent, in writing to Bonnie Rannald. For information on Bonnie Rannald licensed, right-managed images, please submit a written request.

"Reflecting Nature's Artistry"

Follow this blog for upcoming post!
Photos Make Great Gifts!
Many of these images are available on my website.

 http://www.bonnierannald.com/

"Off The Wall" custom matted and framed images.





Monday, November 20, 2017

Tarantulas Wandering Through the Desert



Hairy Casanovas out looking for a mate!


Rarely do I cross paths with a big hairy tarantula that is unless it happens to be mating season in early autumn or late summer.  


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During this year of 2017 on the second week in November I encountered two of these large arachnids passing through my yard. It seems that the warm temperatures we have been experiencing up here in the high desert of Central Nevada have brought on their courtship later than usual.   


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When male tarantulas are on the move, they are erroneously thought to be migrating.  The females are home bodies and remain in their burrows.  So the wandering Casanovas may search for a distance of four miles with the anticipation of finding a willing mate. 


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The average lifespan of the female is 25 years while the male is around 8, if he is not eaten by the female after copulation. 


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Most tarantulas range in size of 2 to 2.5” (50-60mm) for the abdomen and 4” (100mm) with the leg span. 
Tarantulas are most often harmless to humans but if threatened or harassed will shoot sharp spiky hairs from their abdomens which are painful on contact with the skin and especially in the eyes.  


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People who share the desert with these large hairy spiders try to protect them because they are interesting to watch and good for the natural environment.  Their diet consists mostly of pesky insects that are ambushed near the burrow.    


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I bid these hairy Casanovas safe passage through my yard and hope they will find a willing mate.  



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Photography places me in the moment where I can share that moment in time. It becomes a life story as represented by my interaction with the scene. The happiness and beauty or the sorrow and strife; how I focus leaves a lasting impression that might touch the viewer on a spiritual level.



No images on this blog are within Public Domain and are available for free download. 

 All rights reserved, world-wide and images protected by Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). All photography, graphics, text, design, and content is copyrighted by Bonnie Rannald and should not be copied, down-loaded, transferred and re-created in any way without the express consent, in writing to Bonnie Rannald. For information on Bonnie Rannald licensed, right-managed images, please submit a written request.

"Reflecting Nature's Artistry"

Follow this blog for upcoming post!
Photos Make Great Gifts!
Many of these images are available on my website.

 http://www.bonnierannald.com/  

"Off The Wall" custom matted and framed images.





Saturday, November 18, 2017

Lundy Lake an Autumn Retreat


 Mountains, a clear lake with an iconic tree and sunny aspens!


What better way to spend a warm autumn day than at a quiet lake near the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains?  Lundy Lake was my photo destination for this Indian summer day.  The 7858 feet (2395 m) elevation lake is located in Mono County near Lee Vinning California.

I was hoping to catch some color changes in the aspens up in the higher elevations but this autumn of 2017 the weather has been so mild for the central areas of California and Nevada. 

 
Arriving at the 100-acre lake, I was excited to see that the trees were accented in various hues of color.


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Lundy Lake which was formerly know as Mill Creek lies in Lundy Canyon near the towering edges of Yosemite National Park.


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With its clear water, the lake is a popular spot for trout fishing. 


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Rather not go fishing, then how about a picnic by the calm water in shade of a tree surrounded by the serenity of nature? 


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The trunk of a bare cottonwood tree stands in the shallow water near the shore and has become a symbolic icon to the natural beauty of Lundy Lake. 
 

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Driving on past the lake and the dirt road is lined with aspens, some are still green and many are turning brilliant shades of yellow. 


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Further along, the serenity of autumn envelopes the scene as the colorful aspens shroud the landscape. 


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As daylight winds down shadows grown long, time has come to make my departure from this autumn retreat.  


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What an inspiring photo-adventure this trip has been.  Standing on the shore and looking across the deep blue water of this pristine lake, I am alone in the moment feeling the solitude of nature.  There’s just something about the season of autumn that stirs my soul but brings such a feeling of peacefulness too.  


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Photography places me in the moment where I can share that moment in time. It becomes a life story as represented by my interaction with the scene. The happiness and beauty or the sorrow and strife; how I focus leaves a lasting impression that might touch the viewer on a spiritual level.



No images on this blog are within Public Domain and are available for free download. 

 All rights reserved, world-wide and images protected by Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). All photography, graphics, text, design, and content is copyrighted by Bonnie Rannald and should not be copied, down-loaded, transferred and re-created in any way without the express consent, in writing to Bonnie Rannald. For information on Bonnie Rannald licensed, right-managed images, please submit a written request.

"Reflecting Nature's Artistry"

Follow this blog for upcoming post!
Photos Make Great Gifts!
Many of these images are available on my website.
 http://www.bonnierannald.com/



Tuesday, November 14, 2017

The Pronghorn, Nevada's Fastest Land Animal


 Neither an antelope nor a goat but an iconic symbol of North America's Grasslands


How often does the quest for adventure compel you to just follow a hunch?  Thus was the feeling I had on a warm autumn Sunday. 

I took a different road not knowing what to anticipate when suddenly I noticed several pronghorn antelope in the tall grass just off the roadside.  Fearing that they would run away if I pulled over too close, I drove past and stopped on the opposite side of the road.  




 
In the few minutes it took me to gather my camera and walk across the road, a few more pronghorn wandered over closer.



 

 I realized this was a family group or “nursery” of fawns with the mothers.  



 

When I looked up from my camera, I noticed the buck standing off with watchful eyes in the near distance.  The herd or band is comprised of a buck and his harem of females.  The buck will protect his harem from other male pronghorns.    




 
The Pronghorn Antelope is not a true antelope, however it was so named by the Lewis and Clark Expedition.  The Pronghorn Antilocapra Americana is the only surviving member of the Antilocapridae family and is native to North America for over a million years!




 
Pronghorns are named for their branched two point horns made of bone which are shed and re-grown each year.




With my telephoto lens, I was able to keep my distance.  I was wearing muted colors that blended in with the desert but a few of the pronghorns were becoming curious.  Their big eyes and large ears help to detect predators so I was surprised that I all this time I had not been seen as a threat.  





Off in the distance I heard a noise and the herd went of the alert.  I was able to catch several frames as they began to run away.  Pronghorns are the fastest North American land animal, running at speeds of 65 MPH.




A barbed wire fence along the roadside kept the pronghorns from running toward me.  Unlike deer these animals are not good at jumping and will climb under a fence if space allows. 

What a beautiful sight to watch these graceful pronghorns running free across the desert landscape.



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With my Nikon and tripod, my goal is to recreate the scene as it appears in nature, to preserve in a photographic image the awesome, yet simplistic beauty of the scene that waits around a bend or over a hill. Sometimes it's a colorful landscape, and many times I'm allowed in the presence of the numerous creatures that adapt to life in the wild.



No images on this blog are within Public Domain and are available for free download. 

 All rights reserved, world-wide and images protected by Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). All photography, graphics, text, design, and content is copyrighted by Bonnie Rannald and should not be copied, down-loaded, transferred and re-created in any way without the express consent, in writing to Bonnie Rannald. For information on Bonnie Rannald licensed, right-managed images, please submit a written request.

"Reflecting Nature's Artistry"

Follow this blog for upcoming post!
Photos Make Great Gifts!
Many of these images are available on our website.

Visit my website at:
http://www.bonnierannald.com/

"Off The Wall" custom matted and framed images.