Monday, October 25, 2010

How to Trick and Treat with your Kittens



Happy Halloween




Halloween is my favorite time of the year, and not just because it happens to fall during autumn, which is one of my favorite seasons. I am intrigued by themes of witches on broomsticks streaking across the night sky, bats flying around a full moon, but best of all, I like eating the treats!


Getting in the spirit for this year’s Halloween, I made a Jack-O’-Lantern by carving my cat’s face on a pumpkin. When my Jack-O’-Lantern was finished and ready for action, I took it outside to have some fun with the camera.



The bright orange Jack-O’-Lantern was placed by one of my kittens favorite play areas, in hopes that curiosity would take over and they would investigate this new addition.




With my Nikon D90 camera and 35-70mm 2.8 zoom lens secured to the tripod, I waited nearby because I knew that sooner or later the kittens would come and check out the big round shape. I ran the ISO up to 800 for a faster shutter speed, set the aperture at f/8 for depth of field and adjusted the shutter speed between 1/250 to 1/125 seconds.




I took around 80 photos of the kittens before they became bored with their new toy. Here’s a tip on how to get your cat to become interested in the Jack-O’-Lantern, place catnip around and inside of it. If the catnip doesn’t do the trick, try their favorite cat treats.



After dark, I came back out to have some photo fun with my Jack-O’-Lantern and a tea light candle. I lit the tea candle and placed the Jack-O’-Lantern on a black base, where it was level with the camera. With the D90 secured to the tripod, I made several exposures at different settings.




A 15 second exposure on Aperture Mode at f 5.6., 800 ISO, the 35-70mm Nikon lens at 70mm.



On Manual Mode, at f/7.1, shutter speed on bulb, a 4 second exposure with 800 ISO.



So from Sasha, Sophie and everyone at PhotoGraphic Expressions, we with you a happy Halloween with all the treats and no tricks.



No images on this blog are within Public Domain.




With my Nikon and tripod, my goal is to recreate the scene as it appears in nature, to preserve in a photographic image the awesome, yet simplistic beauty of the scene that waits around a bend or over a hill. Sometimes it's a colorful landscape, and many times I'm allowed in the presence of the numerous creatures that adapt to life in the wild.
 All rights reserved, world-wide and images protected by Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). All photography, graphics, text, design, and content is copyrighted by Bonnie Rannald and should not be copied, down-loaded, transferred and re-created in any way without the express consent, in writing to Bonnie Rannald. For information on Bonnie Rannald licensed, right-managed images, please submit a written request.

"Reflecting Nature's Artistry"

Follow this blog for upcoming post!
Photos Make Great Gifts!
Many of these images are available on our website.
We now offer Gift Certificates and Digital Downloads in addition to the
"Off The Wall" custom matted and framed images.




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Sunday, October 17, 2010

Walker Lake Wild Horses


A Community Unites to Save Their Wild Horses

In this post, I would like to deviate from my usual writings about photography and travels to bring attention to the plight of the Walker Lake Wild Horse Herd that BLM has scheduled for roundup around the middle of November, 2010. The Walker Lake Wild Horse Herd has been on the south end of Walker Lake for well over ten years. The area on the south end of Walker Lake is over ten square miles with fresh ground water and abundant native grasses. These wild horses are actually on land that is controlled by the military and restricted for use by the public. US highway 95 runs along and above the south end of Walker Lake and the wild horses are within easy viewing from the road.

The rational behind BLM’s roundup of these wild horses is due to several horses straying on to the highway and getting hit by cars. The speed limit in this area is 70mph.


The communities of Hawthorne and Walker Lake that are located near the wild horses have united to protest BLM’s roundup of this wild horse herd. On October 16, 2010, a rally was held at Veteran’s Memorial Park in Hawthorne to gather the community support with petitions, letters of protest, banners and photos to try and persuade BLM to cancel this roundup. In order to protect the wild horses and prevent them from getting near the highway, plans are underway to construct a fence at the projected cost of $10,000, to run along the highway and taper back to the water’s edge of the lake.


Allowing the Walker Lake Wild Horse Herd to remain at the south end of the lake will benefit the local communities which have been hit very hard by the recession. A local wild horse advocacy group will be formed and will become involved with the Walker Lake Herd. A monitoring program, which has not been previously developed, will be implemented to study the wild horses in their natural habitat. An additional advocacy group, Horsepower has volunteered to lend support to the community and has offered to fund ¼ of the cost of the fence.



Unfortunately, there is still much controversy over whether the Wild Horses on our American Pubic lands are actually wild horses. Many view the present day wild horses as nothing more than feral offspring that were turned out to fend for themselves because they were no longer useful. Others see the wild horses as nuisances who destroy the fragile desert eco-systems and unlike cattle, provide no benefit to humanity. However, scientists are starting to question the theories and documented history of the wild horse. For example, did the horse become entirely extinct in North America, or were there any survivors? Was it the Spanish who brought the horse back to the Americas, or were they returned earlier by the Norsemen or Chinese Explorers? Has the horse always been with some of the Native American tribes as mentioned in their oral histories?

On January 5, 2007, a statement was introduced to the 110th Congress, entitled Wild Horses as Native North American Wildlife, by Jay F. Kirkpatrick, Ph. D. and Patricia M. Fazio, Ph.D, which supports evidence through DNA analysis that the modern horse is genetically equivalent to a horse, that according to fossil records, represented the most recent specimen prior to extinction in North America. In summary, Kirkpatrick and Fazio conclude that native status for wild horses would place these animals, under law, within a new category for management considerations. As a form of wildlife, embedded with wilderness, ancient behavioral patterns, and the morphology and biology of a sensitive prey species, they may finally be released from the “livestock-gone-loose” application.

The future of the Walker Lake Wild Horse Herd remains uncertain and with all the community effort, will it be enough to persuade BLM to allow these horses to remain free? Only time will tell. There are so many benefits including ecotourism and scientific study that could come from keeping this herd intact, but the most important by far is that an American Icon will be allowed to roam free and wild.



For more information:

Mustangs in danger? Too many horses, too little land

Wild Horses as Native North American Wildlife

Horse Power




No images on this blog are within Public Domain.






With my Nikon and tripod, my goal is to recreate the scene as it appears in nature, to preserve in a photographic image the awesome, yet simplistic beauty of the scene that waits around a bend or over a hill. Sometimes it's a colorful landscape, and many times I'm allowed in the presence of the numerous creatures that adapt to life in the wild.
 
 All rights reserved, world-wide and images protected by Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). All photography, graphics, text, design, and content is copyrighted by Bonnie Rannald and should not be copied, down-loaded, transferred and re-created in any way without the express consent, in writing to Bonnie Rannald. For information on Bonnie Rannald licensed, right-managed images, please submit a written request.

"Reflecting Nature's Artistry"

Follow this blog for upcoming post!
Photos Make Great Gifts!
Many of these images are available on our website.
We now offer Gift Certificates and Digital Downloads in addition to the
"Off The Wall" custom matted and framed images.




Visit our website at: http://www.bonnierannald.com/





Monday, October 11, 2010

Hiking at Lundy Lake

Lundy Lake, California


Lundy Lake in the fall is a quiet get a way with a breathtaking view of mountainous terrain, golden aspens and tall evergreens. The high altitude, mile long lake stands at 7858 feet, 2395m, and lies around 15 miles north of Lee Vining, California.


The history of Lundy lake goes back to the mining days in the late 1800's where it's principal use was as a sawmill, producing timber for the nearby mining town of Bodie, California. Lundy Lake was named from the sawmill operator, W. J. Lundy.


Aspen trees, Populus tremuloides, better known as Quaking Aspens or Quakies because their leaves flutter with the slightest breeze, accent the landscape in fall colors of yellow and gold.



There are numerous trail heads at Lundy Lake for hiking or just enjoying the alpine view.


What an enjoyable venture to spend out with my camera, walking along brilliant aspen forests on a fall day at Lundy Lake.


For more information on Lundy Lake, please contact the Lee Vining Chamber of Commerce:


The images in this blog are for sale and available in various sizes.
For information on purchasing prints please contact me at contact@bonnierannald.com



No images on this blog are within Public Domain.






With my Nikon and tripod, my goal is to recreate the scene as it appears in nature, to preserve in a photographic image the awesome, yet simplistic beauty of the scene that waits around a bend or over a hill. Sometimes it's a colorful landscape, and many times I'm allowed in the presence of the numerous creatures that adapt to life in the wild.
 
 All rights reserved, world-wide and images protected by Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). All photography, graphics, text, design, and content is copyrighted by Bonnie Rannald and should not be copied, down-loaded, transferred and re-created in any way without the express consent, in writing to Bonnie Rannald. For information on Bonnie Rannald licensed, right-managed images, please submit a written request.

"Reflecting Nature's Artistry"

Follow this blog for upcoming post!
Photos Make Great Gifts!
Many of these images are available on our website.
We now offer Gift Certificates and Digital Downloads in addition to the
"Off The Wall" custom matted and framed images.




Visit our website at: http://www.bonnierannald.com/





Monday, October 4, 2010

Fall Comes to Zion National Park


Photographing Autumn Colors at Zion National Park

One of my favorite places for photographing autumn colors is Zion National Park, Utah. During the fall season, the trees growing along Zion's incredible canyons are accented with brilliant analogous colors of red, yellow and orange. On this blog entry, I would like to take you on a photo tour of Zion’s beautiful fall scenery.

On a clear day, the deep blue sky provides the perfect backdrop for showcasing the magnificent towers that include the Court of the Patriarchs. The Virgin River flows in the foreground with trees along its shore adorned in fall colors.


At the stream under Weeping Rock, branches of Velvet ash and Fremont Cottonwood create a colorful and serene retreat.


Maple trees of red and gold accent the picnic area with their branches forming an inviting arch to stop under and enjoy the scenery.


In the early fall morning, the rising sun illuminates the Virgin River and accents the trees growing on its bank.


At sundown, golden cottonwoods become muted against the crimson sculptured cliffs of Navajo Sandstone at the park’s entrance.


As the day gives way to night, my camera catches the last light, turning Watchman’s Mountain an even deeper shade of red.



The images in this blog are for sale and available in various sizes
For information on purchasing prints please contact me at  contact@bonnierannald.com 


With my Nikon and tripod, my goal is to recreate the scene as it appears in nature, to preserve in a photographic image the awesome, yet simplistic beauty of the scene that waits around a bend or over a hill. Sometimes it's a colorful landscape, and many times I'm allowed in the presence of the numerous creatures that adapt to life in the wild.

No images on this blog are within Public Domain.

 All rights reserved, world-wide and images protected by Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).

All photography, graphics, text, design, and content is copyrighted by Bonnie Rannald and should not be copied, down-loaded, transferred and re-created in any way without the express consent, in writing to Bonnie Rannald.

 For information on Bonnie Rannald licensed, right-managed images, please submit a written request of the image.

Follow this blog for upcoming post!

Photos Make Great Gifts!

Many of these images are available on our website.

We now offer Gift Certificates and Digital Downloads in addition to the
"Off The Wall" custom matted and framed images.



 Visit our website at: http://www.bonnierannald.com/