Sunday, August 26, 2012

Reno Open Studios

  
Art Touring in Reno, Nevada

 
  
On this blog post, I would like to introduce you to Reno Open Studios and give everyone a personal invitation to join us September 7~9th.


Reno Open Studios is a group of Northwestern Nevada’s finest visual artists who open their studios during the second weekend in September to the public.  During the art touring event, the individual artists will demonstrate their work and techniques, plus this is a great opportunity to purchase the art directly from the artist.  

Since my art medium is nature photography, I would like to take you on a short tour of my studio. Along with spending time on the computer processing RAW digital images in Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom, I also enjoy countless hours in the open studio of nature.



Being a professional nature photographer with a background in athletics, I get many requests to photograph outdoor events.


 Event photography is exciting and very challenging because it puts me in the moment and I only get that one click of the shutter to get it right.



Sometimes my photography gets me in to interesting places like the Temecula Tractor Races with Stephanie Prescott, co-producer for NBC's Tournament of Roses Parade telecast.



Most of the time, my photography is spent on scenes of nature that I just happen to come upon, like with this group of Desert Bighorn Sheep waiting it out in a snow storm.  By the way, this framed 11"x14" photograph is my donation to the Reno Open Studio's art scholarship fund.  Donation tickets will be available at my studio location.



For maps and additional information, please follow the link:





No images on this blog are within Public Domain.






With my Nikon and tripod, my goal is to recreate the scene as it appears in nature, to preserve in a photographic image the awesome, yet simplistic beauty of the scene that waits around a bend or over a hill. Sometimes it's a colorful landscape, and many times I'm allowed in the presence of the numerous creatures that adapt to life in the wild.
 
 All rights reserved, world-wide and images protected by Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). All photography, graphics, text, design, and content is copyrighted by Bonnie Rannald and should not be copied, down-loaded, transferred and re-created in any way without the express consent, in writing to Bonnie Rannald. For information on Bonnie Rannald licensed, right-managed images, please submit a written request.

"Reflecting Nature's Artistry"

Follow this blog for upcoming post!
Photos Make Great Gifts!
Many of these images are available on our website.
We now offer Gift Certificates and Digital Downloads in addition to the
"Off The Wall" custom matted and framed images.




Visit our website at: http://www.bonnierannald.com/





Saturday, August 18, 2012

Walker Lake Water Fowl


A Day of Birding at Walker Lake 

Walker Lake is a natural lake lying within the Great Basin Desert that is also on the Pacific Flyway, the north-south travel route for American migratory birds. Fed by the Walker River which has been diverted for agricultural use, the water level of Walker Lake has dropped over 126 feet (38.40 m) from its 1882 elevation of 4083 feet (1244.5 m).  As the lake recedes, salinity increases and has reached a critical level  where the water can no longer support the native, Lahontan Cutthroat Trout.  A smaller fish, the Tui Chub which is a major food source for the Cutthroat Trout and numerous water fowl has also become endangered.



As salty as the lake has become, it still attracts large numbers of birds to its cool, clear waters.  




Large white American Pelicans fly back and forth between Walker and Pyramid Lake on a daily basis in the warm months.  The American Pelican does not dive for food, but catches it while swimming.



Phalaropes or wadepipers are halophilic (salt-loving) shorebirds.  Feeding on small insects or crustaceans, they breed in western North American and migrate to South American.



California Gulls are the state bird of Utah and noted for assisting the Mormon settlers in the plague of Mormon crickets.  They forage in flight on insects and also feed on fish while swimming.



One of the unique characteristics of Walker Lake is the Orb-weaver Spiders that thrive in the hot summer months of July and August.  The spiders set up communal webs that cover the rocks and boulders.  Their favorite food source is the damselfly which can be seen covering part of the webs.  Keeping nature in check, the spiders help feed the shore birds and also the lizards that live around the rocky banks. 

  



No images on this blog are within Public Domain.






With my Nikon and tripod, my goal is to recreate the scene as it appears in nature, to preserve in a photographic image the awesome, yet simplistic beauty of the scene that waits around a bend or over a hill. Sometimes it's a colorful landscape, and many times I'm allowed in the presence of the numerous creatures that adapt to life in the wild.
 
 All rights reserved, world-wide and images protected by Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). All photography, graphics, text, design, and content is copyrighted by Bonnie Rannald and should not be copied, down-loaded, transferred and re-created in any way without the express consent, in writing to Bonnie Rannald. For information on Bonnie Rannald licensed, right-managed images, please submit a written request.

"Reflecting Nature's Artistry"

Follow this blog for upcoming post!
Photos Make Great Gifts!
Many of these images are available on our website.
We now offer Gift Certificates and Digital Downloads in addition to the
"Off The Wall" custom matted and framed images.




Visit our website at: http://www.bonnierannald.com/





Monday, August 13, 2012

Mono Lake's Unique Diversity


 Nature Adapts to an Alien Environment 


If you take away the deep blue sky and clear air, Mono Lake has a topography that is as alien as any extra-terrestrial environment.   Born from the eruptions of volcanoes, the tectonic basin of Mono Lake was additionally designed by faulting and down-warping of the earth's crust some one to 3 million years ago.



Mono Craters, domes of rhyolite that exploded from volcanoes during the last 40,000 years and as recently as 700 years ago. 



 A natural lake with no outlet, Mono's water has a unique chemistry that makes it saltier than the ocean. Volcanic ash and underwater springs rich in calcium create a mix that make Mono very alkaline.


 The lake can not support fish; however the algae, brine shrimp and alkali flies contribute to a complex ecosystem, attracting millions of birds that come in for nesting and feeding. The black area in the right lower corner is a large concentration of alkali flies.




 Part of the un-worldly appearance of Mono Lake comes from the Tufa towers, strange rock formations that grow underwater from the calcium in the underwater springs that mixes with carbonates in the lake water. Some Tufa towers reach heights over 30 feet, 9.144 meters.



Black Point on the north shore of Mono is one of the volcanic islands that were formed from recent eruptions around 13,000 years ago, when the lake was 400 feet, 121.92 meters deeper than it is today.  



The Mono Basin is nestled in against the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountain Range, which is also one of the entrances to Yosemite National Park.  A glimpse into this ancient era with so many intriguing explorations yet to uncover will be the focus of future blog posts, so check back often to see what unfolds.




No images on this blog are within Public Domain.






With my Nikon and tripod, my goal is to recreate the scene as it appears in nature, to preserve in a photographic image the awesome, yet simplistic beauty of the scene that waits around a bend or over a hill. Sometimes it's a colorful landscape, and many times I'm allowed in the presence of the numerous creatures that adapt to life in the wild.
 
 All rights reserved, world-wide and images protected by Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). All photography, graphics, text, design, and content is copyrighted by Bonnie Rannald and should not be copied, down-loaded, transferred and re-created in any way without the express consent, in writing to Bonnie Rannald. For information on Bonnie Rannald licensed, right-managed images, please submit a written request.

"Reflecting Nature's Artistry"

Follow this blog for upcoming post!
Photos Make Great Gifts!
Many of these images are available on our website.
We now offer Gift Certificates and Digital Downloads in addition to the
"Off The Wall" custom matted and framed images.




Visit our website at: http://www.bonnierannald.com/





Monday, August 6, 2012

Weather Adventures at Mono Lake

       
 Thunderstorms and Monsoons Make for Interesting Photos


During the first week of August, a weak offshore low-pressure system coming in from the Pacific was forecast to produce thunder storms over the areas of Nevada and the Central California Valley. Being a storm chaser at heart, I decided to take a chance on getting some interesting weather photos, so I made a day trip over to Mono Lake which is located within the Mono Basin, next to the Eastern Sierra Range.


 Mono Lake has a most interesting history as one of the oldest natural lakes in North America and is also surrounded by inactive volcanoes in one of the youngest volcanic chains in North America. More information and photos will be coming about Mono Lake in the preceding posts.



Being part of the Great Basin Desert, at an elevation of 6,383 ft (1,946 m) above sea level, the daytime temperatures can vary at Mono Lake from around 100 °F (37.78 °C) to 70 °F (21.1 °C).  For most of the summer, Mono’s weather is more of a Mediterranean Climate, warm and dry.  However, a southerly flow can bring isolated thunderstorms that will produce monsoon weather patterns.  This was the weather that I was hoping would occur during my photo shoot.




By late afternoon, it is getting hot and as the warm, moist air meets the cooler air, thunder cells produce mirco bursts of rain. 



The mirror smooth, calm lake is on the verge of turning tumultuous.


 Smoke from a lightning strike can be seen on a distant mountain peak.


The wind drives the rain across the lake, it's time to head for cover!


A California Gull takes flight, signaling that for now, the worse has past.





No images on this blog are within Public Domain.






With my Nikon and tripod, my goal is to recreate the scene as it appears in nature, to preserve in a photographic image the awesome, yet simplistic beauty of the scene that waits around a bend or over a hill. Sometimes it's a colorful landscape, and many times I'm allowed in the presence of the numerous creatures that adapt to life in the wild.
 
 All rights reserved, world-wide and images protected by Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). All photography, graphics, text, design, and content is copyrighted by Bonnie Rannald and should not be copied, down-loaded, transferred and re-created in any way without the express consent, in writing to Bonnie Rannald. For information on Bonnie Rannald licensed, right-managed images, please submit a written request.

"Reflecting Nature's Artistry"

Follow this blog for upcoming post!
Photos Make Great Gifts!
Many of these images are available on our website.
We now offer Gift Certificates and Digital Downloads in addition to the
"Off The Wall" custom matted and framed images.




Visit our website at: http://www.bonnierannald.com/